Of the Princess and the Smile-Maker

posted by Sharon July 2, 2013 18 Comments
Hollywood Cemetery

A cemetery is a good place to think about life. You find the famous, the heroes, and the everyday people. The gravestones tell something of how family and friends felt about the person laid to rest.

The Hollywood Cemetery is home to some unusual markers.

You can still see the simple ones, mostly from the 1940s and 50s but some from even further back.

But in Hollywood, you will also find art on the stones.

Stones are in shapes of objects: hearts and books, for example. And a lifesized sculpture.

Something new to me was the inclusion of photos on the stones.

Whether ornate or bare, many of the markers tell the role of the person in the family. Daughter, wife, mother. Most often the word “beloved” is also carved in the granite. That’s fine, but I love when the family goes beyond “Beloved mother” and describes something else about the person. This woman died young, with an “Unfinished Agenda.”

This one puzzles me:

Here’s my favorite inscription:

Wouldn’t you be pleased to be known as a “smile-maker”? What a wonderful heritage to leave.

Cemeteries are a good place to think about our lives and how we might like to be described in the minds and hearts of those we love.

How about you? If you could chose one word to be known by, what would it be?

Linking up with Texture Tuesday, Tuesday Muse, Sweet Shot Tuesdays,Tones on Tuesday, and Communal Global.

The photos are edited with Kim Klassen’s textures History and Storm and Nancy Claey’s texture 220.

 

 

 

 

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18 Comments

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Evelyn in Oregon July 2, 2013 at 5:28 am

Have you ever read “Spoon River Anthology” by Edgar Lee Masters? I used to teach it in one of my high school English classes. The epitaphs weren’t one word, but they were fascinating—from the viewpoint of the departed one. I visit our rural cemetery often, especially early in the morning or later in the evening; it’s a great location for a variety of photo subjects in the wonderful quiet on the hill.

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Pieni lintu July 2, 2013 at 7:17 am

Beautiful photos!

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Katie July 2, 2013 at 8:03 am

So interesting. I love the photos in the stones and Johnny Ramone’s statue. I guess I would like it to be known that I loved my life. Maybe just that. To sum it up. Personally, I wouldn’t want a plot or stone as I want to avoid taking up space, but if I did have one, I would want there to be a load of sharpie markers nearby for doodlers to have fun on my stone.

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Raymonde July 2, 2013 at 8:15 am

I saw the name of your blog and then I noticed the leaning tomb stone, it made me smile. I love those shots and yes I like looking at tomb stones and imagining the lives of the people buried by what is written.
I asked just one thing of my family, could they please not use “nice” in any way shape or form in the eulogy for me.
Have a great week
Visiting from P52

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Tamar Strauss-Benjamin July 2, 2013 at 10:59 am

These are such amazing stones. I can only begin to imagine the type of people who merited those stones!

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Snap July 2, 2013 at 12:05 pm

Cemeteries have so many untold stories … wonderful, historical places. Great shots.

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Molly July 2, 2013 at 12:34 pm

I love cemeteries, they seem to ooze stories and history

Mollyxxx

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Barbara Hurst July 2, 2013 at 1:07 pm

I love cemeteries and this one is a good one, love the last one, I would like to be thought of as a Smile Maker.

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kim July 2, 2013 at 1:54 pm

What a neat walk through with you! These are all interesting and several are inspiring!

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Nancy July 2, 2013 at 6:18 pm

I watched a documentary on punk rock some time ago and remember seeing Johnny Ramone’s tombstone. These all tell such great stories. No marker for me — or plot. I guess each person will have their own thoughts about my existence good or bad. ๐Ÿ™‚

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Ida P. Krause July 2, 2013 at 10:50 pm

What an interesting trip through this cemetery. We’ve got some unusual head stones in our local cemetery as well. I’ve just never thought to photograph them.

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Robyn July 2, 2013 at 11:52 pm

Neat post, Sharon! I agree cemeteries are a neat place to visit. Headstones can be as creative as the imagination. I have never seen a lifesized sculpture and like the look of an open book.

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Prairie Jill July 3, 2013 at 4:15 am

What an interesting place! I loved the music on the stones, and I agree: “smile-maker” is a very nice heritage.

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shanleighphoto July 3, 2013 at 4:39 am

Wow, I’ve never been there but it looks fascinating. Living just down the road in OC, I’ll have to make a trip (especially now that I know J. Ramone was buried there). Great post.

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dalettre July 3, 2013 at 12:34 pm

I really love this, Sharon. What a great collection of photos!

P.S. I used the PIP app for the photos that you liked in my instagram post. It’s a really fun app!

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Pride in Photos Photography July 3, 2013 at 2:53 pm

The Mabel tombstone, really spoke to me, it was my grandmothers name and our granddaughters middle name who is in heaven…thanks for sharing. It warmed my heart.

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Tammy/Our Neck of the Woods July 3, 2013 at 4:47 pm

Those are so unique! I’ve never seen tombstones like that before. I do like the one describing the man as a “smile maker.” Great way to be remembered!

PS – Thanks for visiting my blog and commenting ๐Ÿ™‚

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Peabea July 4, 2013 at 7:35 pm

Great photo sharing. Recently, I was the one delegated to pick out mine and hubby’s. There are so many choices, but I did visit the cemetery for ideas. One I liked in our local was of a guy who has a headstone, but it says gone fishing. His ashes are in Lake Erie, but I’m assuming the wife stayed home. haha ๐Ÿ™‚

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